Credit Card Telephone Scams You Should Avoid

Thieves never run out of tricks to collect credit card information so they can open fraudulent account in other people’s name. One of these tactics is to convince the credit card holder to give up his or her credit card and/or other personal information through credit card telephone scams. Crooks don’t just ring your phone and ask for credit information. They do it by making a fake situation to convince you to give up some your personal information to meet a need.

Even though phone scams may sound outdated, they still run rampant. They are especially effective against the elderly.  Make sure you and your loved ones are knowledgeable enough when it comes to the most common telephone scams like these:


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Don’t Get Threatened by Fake IRS Calls

Swindlers are masters of emotional manipulation. These con artists push psychological buttons adding a sense of urgency to intimidate you and get you make a move without thinking about it. What do people fall for the most? Fake IRS calls.

Scammers have been calling people recently pretending to be the IRS warning them that there was an error in their last tax filing and that this call was their final notice.

They might also warn people, threatening to take them to jail or to deport them if they don’t act fast. For an unsuspecting person, this kind of threat could overwhelm any doubt they might have had with the call. That fear may lead straight to the impulsive action, which the scammers wanted.

A tell tale sign that you are on the line with a fake IRS agent is they will say they can clear up the problem if you go and make a payment thru Western Union.   If you send money via Western Union, that money can’t be traced once you find out you have been scammed.  There is also no recourse, so you won’t get that money back.

 

Watch Out for Fake Fundraisers and Charities

You might receive a cold call every so often asking you to contribute for a local organization’s fundraising campaign. Beware as this could be a scam. Once scammers obtain your financial information, they are so close in using your credit or opening account in your name.

The solution to this is simple. If you want to contribute, hang up and confirm by calling the local organization they are referring to. It’s a bit awkward, but it lessens your chances of getting scammed. The FBI also recommends that you request written material about any charitable work before making a donation.

 

What to do if you’re a Victim of Telephone Scam

If you’ve given out your personal information by mistake, call your credit card issuer right away. They’ll be the one to immediately close your account and issue a new card to you.

To avoid further credit card fraud, check your account online in a regular basis, read your card’s billing statement thoroughly, as well as report any suspicious activity to the issuer of your credit card immediately.

If you gave out your social security number to someone by accident, you can place a security freeze or fraud alert on your credit report in order to prevent new fraudulent accounts from being opened under your name.  A security freeze will not allow anyone to view, or obtain new credit with your information unless they have a password that was issued by the credit reporting agencies. They will also have to pay to “un-freeze” your credit report.

A fraud alert alerts creditors that there maybe fraud being done against your account and they are supposed to call the number you gave to verify that its you that is applying for the new line of credit.

Between the two, the credit freeze is a lot harder to circumvent. It stays in effect until you lift it.  While a fraud alert only last 90 days and some people forget to renew it.  Fraudsters that know you put a fraud alert on your credit report can wait the 90 days.  To them, this is a business.  So they keep good records.  They will test your account again in 90+ days and see if they can purchase anything with your credit. While with a credit freeze they will have no idea when, or even if you will lift the freeze.  They may try again a few times and then just move on to another victim if they can’t get to you anymore!

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Elizabeth Roberts

Elizabeth Roberts

Liz Roberts and her team are continuously providing information to people who are ready to repair their credit and improve their credit score. Also NewHorizon.org team strives to empower the homebased and small business owners by bringing information that can help them to manage and grow their businesses. Let our 24+ years of business finance experience help you to get the financing you need! CONTACT US if need financing for your business.

15 Comments
  1. Great tips. We have gotten the fake IRS calls before and I am always floored at their audacity and how mean they can get on the phone. These are great pointers. Thanks for sharing!

  2. This is such a great blog and these are very important tips/reminders to protect yourself from credit card scammers. I’ve been scammed once!

  3. Reply img-11
    Robin Masshole Mommy December 13, 2016 at 3:46 am

    I don’t have credit cards,so I had no idea these were even a thing. How scary that this kind of stuff happens.

  4. This is much needed information. I have received some of these fake steal your money calls. Now they are popping up on the computer.

  5. Those fake IRS scams are so annoying. You’d think they’d catch them eventually. It’s been going on forever. I always feel sorry for the elderly. They seem to be the ones that fall for these scams because they are so trusting.

  6. Great info, especially this time of year. We helped an elderly friend refrain from being a phone scam victim once. We all have to stay informed because the bad guys are constantly cooking up new scams.

  7. There are SO many now-a-days it is really sad! I have become hyper aware of them. My parents almost fell for one a few months ago, but they figured it out before it was too late!

  8. It is sad how many dishonest people there are in this world!! This is great advice to avoid being scammed out of hard earned money.

  9. This is such great information. Scammers are getting more and more sophisticated. It’s important to stay vigilant!

  10. I have been getting a lot of scam calls lately. They almost got my mother and father in law convinced that they were real. Luckily they didn’t fall for it.

  11. I rarely answer my phone if I don’t recognize the number. They can leave me a message and I’ll return it. I hate all the phone scams out there.

  12. I’ve gotten a few of these scam calls and although I did not know for sure they sounded strange. Thanks for the great tips as there are more and more scam calls and we have to be careful.

  13. This is a great post and something everyone should pay attention too. I know I have had them calls but never fell for them. It is terrible what they do to people. Thanks for sharing the information on how to avoid the credit card telephone scams.

  14. This is a post with information people should know about. The telephone scams can devastate those it happens too. It is a shame that these people take advantage of especially the elder. Thanks for sharing the tips on how to avoid these scams.

  15. Great post and tips! Anytime someone calls that appears to be a scammer I just hang up on them.

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NewHorizon.org is an independent, advertising supported website. The owner of the site may be compensated in exchange for featured placement of certain sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. NewHorizon.org has not reviewed all available credit card offers in the marketplace.

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